Category Archives: MCC

Is this a normal feeling.

The Match is 5 days away. As I sit here and wait on patients to show up there are a million things that are going through my head right now. Everything from what’s going to be for dinner, where are we going to be living once we figure out where I match, why is this week going by so slow, how many miles am I going to run tonight, why are first weeks of rotations so awkward, I need to go grocery shopping, etc. I’m sure that drives my point home.
I can’t seem to focus long enough to read more than one or two pages in my endocrinology book. This stuff is pretty interesting too.

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I feel that this picture is pretty representative of my life right now. This coat hanger has so much potential. I’m sure will hold many coats in its future and stay in the wall for many years to come. Unfortunately right now it is sitting in a brand new office waiting for someone to pick it, someone to need it to hold their coat, right now it’s just two screws hanging out of the back of a panel.

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Charts of information will haunt me FOREVER

Anesthesiology rotation. This is an important rotation. It is important to add this information to my medical knowledge, especially since I am going to be performing surgery in my future career. I remember learning pharmacology two years ago. Why didn’t this information stay in my brain. Local anesthetics, general anesthesia medication, volatile gases, nondepolarizing versus depolarizing agents. Fasiculations, what’s that? I really need this information to stick!

  • Drugs
  • Induction doses
  • Maintenance doses
  • Drug onset
  • Drug half-life
  • any other information that is IMPORTANT

 

It has been a long time since I had to make charts to remember drugs, but I guess it worked for pharmacology. Hopefully it will work for this rotation.

6 girls and everything that comes with them = LOUD family

4 years worth of friendship.

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or if you want to see 4 years in a flash:

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Magical place

I was told a few years ago, “4th year of medical school is a magical place.” Well finally with 10 weeks of rotations left I might actually agree with this statement.
The first half of fourth year is very stressful and little sleep happens. You work your tail of at all of your audition rotations as so that you discover how well you fit with the program and the residents. These are the people that you are going to be spending the good majority of the next 4+ years of your life with.
Well interviews have come and gone. The “interview trail” is over. I am back at home for good. I have 10 weeks left of being a medical student.
The rotation that I started on Monday is great. I have never done an anesthesia rotation, so this is a new experience, new things to learn, new people to work with, and hours that I definitely cannot complain about. I am at work before the sun comes up, but it is worth it. Spending the majority of my medical school education on the sterile side of the sheet, I am now getting a different perspective of surgery and the surgical patient. Also even though pharmacology still makes me cringe, learning about all the medications used for anesthesia and the process of anesthesia is a very interesting subject and fun. The doctor and CRNAs that I am working with are pretty amazing too. There has been good medical knowledge being gained and good life lessons being observed and learned this month.
It doesn’t matter what field of medicine I am rotating in and learning about each rotation I still ask myself, “will I ever know as much? be as good as? be a good resident? one day, a good attending?”
Knowing that the “Match” happens in 26 days is a bit stressful, but fortunately I am enjoying the rest of my fourth year.

Medicine from a paper towel

Learning today: you were taught medicine and pathology this way, whereas sickness presents this way.

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Unfortunately people don’t walk around with signs on them telling you: this is how I should present in your clinic, and these are the signs and symptoms that really matter. At least sometimes they give us clues.
Guess that’s why I am becoming a doctor, so that one day I will be able to connect the dots.

survived

I survived the first day of rotations.

I might have fallen in love with pediatrics today. This might happen on the first day of every rotation, or not. Actually getting to see real patients with real problems was worth the past two years of classroom work. I also actually knew some of the answers to the questions that our attending was asking us.  I also like it when a patient presents the way that the book says they will.

I am sure there will be the ups and downs, being completely exhausted, and everything else that comes with being a medical student, but tonight I will live in this little cloud, keep positive thoughts, and prepare myself for 6 a.m. rounds in the morning.

the wards

Monday morning is the beginning of something I have been waiting on for a very long time: The time that I no longer have to sit in a classroom and the beginning of 3rd year clinical rotations.

I have my stethoscope, panoptic ophthalmoscope, “Maxwell’s”, “Practical Guide to The Care of the Medical Patient” pocket book, black pens, pin light, different medical apps loaded on my iphone, and “Sanford’s Guide to Antibiotics”.  Should I pack a lunch, do I put snacks in my pockets, do I need a toy since I am going to be on peds? Many, many questions. Guess it will be trial by fire.

Class of 2014 let’s show them what we got!