Category Archives: OMS-II

The ending of the beginning

Last Tuesday officially marked the end of two years of book work, sleepless nights of studying for exams, and the classroom education to becoming a physician. On July 1st a new chapter begins: clinical rotations.
Looking back at the past two years I think I can officially say that it was the longest and the shortest two years of my life. From the first day of endless printing and crying about how there is absolutely NO way I could possibly learn or maybe even read all of this information, to meeting some of the best friends I have ever had, learning that it is possible to learn a ton of information, have some kind of social life, stay in a committed and loving marriage, and the minimal amount of sleep that I actually need to feel like a human being the next day and pass an exam.
COMLEX boards were the beast that had to be overcome before I could have a very tiny summer break. Trying to keep up with Doctors in Training during the semester, COMBANK, and the other Q-banks, plus perform well in my actual classes proved to be a difficult task. I managed to, well sorta. And to top things off a solid month of 8-14 hour days of studying. I would just like to thank my husband for putting up with me through all of this, thank the girl that made sure I had a stress outlet to discuss boards with, the guy that sent me so many questions to test my knowledge and for all the love, prayers, support, and encouragement that so many people provided me.
Vacation with the husband and parents has proven to be a much needed stress relief and fun.
I will be learning and working hard for the rest of my life, but I am so glad that the past two years are behind me. The next two years are going to be hard and challenging, but I am so excited to actually get to see medicine in action.

For now though I am going to enjoy my vacation.

First assist

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We had the opportunity today to learn how to be first assist in surgery. The opportunities that we have been given as second year medical students makes me feel that we aren’t 100% being thrown to the wolves when we start clinical rotations as 3rd year medical students in July. Don’t get me wrong, we are learning the bare minimum basic principles of how to conduct ourselves in a hospital, operating room, or clinic and still have SO much to learn. We are just very blessed to be given all of these opportunities by our school collaborating with the amazing teachers, programs, and students at Tulsa Tech.
This was great timing in the semester. One more thing to keep me motivated to get me through boards. 8 weeks, 8 weeks.

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some of my favorites

This is what we do for extended study breaks. Well in November, and did I mention that I love it that Christmas starts in November at Disney World? Great GIRLS WEEKEND! We need another one of these.

h&p


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HI! I’m student doctor Duroy and I will be examining you today.

Writing my first H&P:  what is an H&P? How long is this going to take? How many questions do I have to ask? What all do I have to examine?  what does that word mean? Oh, good thing this is just on a family member.

Second year H&P 3 week of fall semester: oh! I think I remember that I did one of these at some point during the spring semester. I have an hour and a half, that’s a really long time! Surely I won’t need to use it all. Well that was a wrong assumption to make.  Maybe I should practice with this stuff a little more.

Second year H&P spring semester: I know what word means. Maxwell’s is my friend. Scunt Monkey is pretty cool.

CC:HPI:PHM:PSH:Allergies:Social Hx: Meds: ROS: does this need to be focused or all-inclusive? Physical exam: Did I forget anything? Oh, I even did some extra test. These patients aren’t as scary as I remember them being. I am not sweating as much as I remember. I know how to use these tools.

Dang it, I knew I forgot something. Definitely need more practice. Let’s see what I can come up with.

Maybe one day this will come as second nature?

NRHA trip to Washington D.C.

The National Rural Health Policy Institute was a few weeks ago, Sunday, January 29 – Wednesday, February 1st.  This was a great school trip, a great professional experience, and a great way to learn about legislation that will be affecting the my profession, the hospitals I will work in and with each day, and my patients one day.

One of the many themes of the Policy Institute was that: cutting rural funding does not make fiscal sense.  This would mean cutting close access off to many many families that live in rural America.

There were many things that I learned at the policy institute.

  • Sequestration: If Sequestration passes then it will disproportionately harm rural providers and should be modified. The Budget control act mandated that Medicare spending sequester that will disproportionately harm rural providers and should be modified to avoid crisis in access to care.  People, politicians, most of the population does not realize the actual obstacles faced by health care providers and patients in rural areas are vastly different than those in urban areas.  Rural facilities are more dependent on Medicare reimbursement based on the population of patients they serve. With all of this being said if a two percent cut where taken from rural providers it would cause catastrophic gaps in access to care for a large percent of the population.

Here is some more information that I learned about rural healthcare:

  • There is a higher uninsured and Medicaid population that is serviced at these hospitals.  Small rural hospitals also operate on a much narrower financial margin.  Keeping the 2% is vital to keeping the doors at CAH, MDH, and HMC facilities open.
  • 1/3 of hospitals in the United States are Critical Access Hospitals, which accounts for 5% of Medicare expenditures.
  • PLEASE GOVERNMENT, DON’T THROW RURAL MEDICINE AND HEALTHCARE UNDER THE BUS!
  • Each physician in a rural community brings 23 jobs to the community
  • 25% of the population in American lives on 90% of the landmass in the United States and only 9% of physicians in the United States practice in rural communities. This seemed to be a statement that was restated many times throughout the conference. LESS THAN 10% OF PHYSICIANS PRACTICE IN RURAL AMERICA
  • One major point also trying to be driven across is that you should not have to go to a major city to get the best medical care , technology can help improve the quality of care in rural America: There are new telemedicine grants available, these are through the Rural Network Enforcement development grants.

The National Rural Health Service Cor. was at the Policy Institute. Mary WakefieldHealth Resources and Services Administration, (HRSA)

  • there are so many great opportunities offered to medical students and physicians through the National Rural Health Service Cor: Home – NHSC. They can help with loan repayment and job placement. Ms. Mary Wakerfield talked about how this is important for helping get physicians into the rural or underserved areas and hopefully getting those people truly invested in the community so that they will stay in the community after their service time is up. 
  • One of the most important things that was learned and experienced at the National Rural Health Policy Institute is how important it is for physicians to stay active in the politics of medicine. It is only the people that actually live in, practice in, work in the hospitals, and rural communities not only of Oklahoma,but of all the areas in the US that know what we truly need to improve healthcare.  Our voice needs to be heard.
  • Stay active throughout your career, no matter what part of the healthcare field you are in.
  • For more information on the National Rural Health Policy Institute or just rural medicine in general check out: NRHA – National Rural Health Association Home Page.
  • Grassroots movements:NRHA – Grassroots Action Center.
  • OSU Rural Health.
  • (1) OSU Center for Rural Health.
  • Physicians Manpower Training Commission.
  • GME Funding – Initiatives – AAMC.